Research 1930s

In the 1930s there was a return to a more genteel, ladylike appearance. Budding rounded busts and waistline curves were seen and hair became softer and prettier as hair perms improved. Foreheads which had been hidden by cloche hats were revealed and adorned with small plate shaped hats.

Generally fashions of the 1930s are thought of as glamorous and sensuous. This is the era of the big bands, dancing and night life.

The dresses are long and elegant, evening gowns were often backless and importantly there develops a very distinct difference between daywear and evening wear.

Hollywood and the movies also begin to be very influential to the fashion industry as people wanted to wear the styles they had seen on the screen.

Bias cut evening gowns of shiny satins and silks were the ultimate glamour tool, influenced by the movies, which were all the more becoming huge style inspiration.

        

Suits and furs. Fur was used extensivley in the ’30s, the term “endangered” was not yet in use, as fur was too much of a fashionable trimming for it to leave. While it was seen some in the forties, it was everywhere in the ’20s and ’30s.

 

 

Style Icons of the Silver Screen

Norma Shearer, Greta Garbo, Joan Crawford, Jean Harlow, Loretta Young… Trend-setting stars of the motion picture’s golden age, who had clothes designed specifically for them by the best costume desginers to make them sparkle on the screen.

Norma Shearer

The elegant, chic society madame, immpecably ladylike and yet seductive, she played many roles in this persona.

  

 

Jean Harlow

The ultimate wisecracking femme fatale, Jean Harlow was the 1930s Marilyn Monroe. Her platinum blonde hair, caused a huge raise in the sales of peroxide, and her distinctive looks and scandalous films caused a sensation across America.

 

  


Joan Crawford

A big drama actress, her career spanned much more than just the thirties. This star’s distinctively shaped lips and wide shoulders set a fashion across the nation.

 

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